Training Programme on Urban Rainwater Harvesting, 26-29 December, 2006 | Centre for Science and Environment


Training Programme on Urban Rainwater Harvesting, 26-29 December, 2006

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List of participants
     

B Ramesh Kumar
Senior Scientific Assistant
Kerala State Remote Sensing and Environment Centre
Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 
rameshkumar_ksrec@rediffmail.com

Suhas Joshee
Geologist 
Advanced Centre for Water Resources Development and Management
Pune, Maharashtra 
suhasjoshee@jmail.com

Sarvar Khan
Engineer 
TCE Consulting Engineers Ltd.
New Delhi 
skhan@tce.co.in

Ram Avtar Agrawal
Sr Officer Safety
Vitlife Laboratories 
Gurgaon, Haryana
safety@vitalifelabs.com

Alpana Sharma
Student 
Vellore institute of technology
Dhanbad, Jharkhand 
alpusharma2006@gmail.com

 

Deepali Dutta
Freeelancer
Faridabad, Haryana 
deepali@technomanage.com

S Arunachalam
Asst. Chief Engineer 
ITC Maurya Sheraton
Hotel & Towers
New Delhi
s.arunaachalam@itcwelcomgroup.in
arunaachalams@yahoo.com

J.V.Kartik
Student 
Vellore institute of technology
Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh 
joshulavks@gmail.com

Madhu Agrawal
Reader
Janki Devi Memorial College
New Delhi

Deepak Kaushik
Integrated Development Perspectives
Gurgaon, Haryana 
deepakkaushik@iitdalumni.com

Sejuti Basu
Kolkata
sejutibasu@yahoo.co.in

Training Date: 
26-29 December, 2006

Announcements

  • December 12, 2017

    10 AM – 8:30 PM

    Juniper Hall, Indian Habitat Centre (IHC), Lodhi Road, New Delhi

    India produces 62 million tonnes of municipal solid waste every year. Per capita waste generation is increasing in the country by about 1.3 per cent annually, a massive problem made worse by India’s growing urban population. The only way to get out of this mess is segregation and recycle-reuse. 

  • With rapid urbanisation and rising consumption of goods and services, India is facing a massive waste management challenge. Every year, urban India produces 62 million tonne (MT) of municipal solid waste, 31 MT of which is dumped onto landfill sites. Figures for recycling are abysmal; for instance, only 1.5 per cent of e-waste is recycled. The need of the hour is to shift the focus of waste management towards processing and resource recovery.

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