CSE | Centre for Science and Environment

CSE


Green CSE

CSE has excellent infrastructure that is appropriate to its needs and is used intensively and maintained very well. 

The buildings have environment friendly architecture that allows for maximum utilization of natural light and air keeping the use of artificial lighting minimal and need for air-conditioning limited to only the peak summer months. 

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Recycling paper

recycling paper

CSE is a low paper consumption organization and only a minimal quantity of paper is used each day. While most of the information is exchanged electronically, some amount of printing on fresh paper does take place. However, all fresh A4 printed sheets are meticulously recycled. They are once again used for making photocopies.

Treating solid waste

CSE started this practice to showcase successful decentralised management of the solid waste and also to reduce the discharge of the solid waste from its own campus. Solid waste composting is a process to prepare compost from the biodegradable organic material which can be used as soil conditioner or organic fertilizer.

Two types of wastes generated in the CSE: 

  1. From leftover cooked food (collected from canteen) 

  2. From uncooked raw vegetable waste ( also known as kitchen waste) and dry leaves 

Training Programme on Urban Rainwater Harvesting, Colombo, Sri Lanka

Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) in collaboration with the Ministry of Water Supply and Drainage (MWS&D), Sri Lanka and Colombo based NGO, Lanka Rainwater Harvesting Forum (LRWHF) organised a three day training programme in Colombo on ‘Urban Rainwater Harvesting’ for Srilankan government officials between 27th and 29th April, 2011.

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Toxic toys

We generally take toys for granted but this may no longer be the case atleast not if we are concerned about the health of our young children.
A recent laboratory study by the Centre for Science and Environment shows the presence of phthalates, a highly toxic chemical, in toys sold in the Indian market.

Bhopal: toxic legacy

For over 25 years the impoverished residents of Bhopal have been silently suffering the consequences of contamination caused by a ruthless, money making multi national pesticide company. But not anymore, their tireless struggle led the Centre for Science and Environment to investigate what they have been alleging all along that the water and soil around the factory had been heavily contaminated. CSE's investigation revealed the extent of contamination in the vicinity of location of the world's largest industrial disaster site was unparalleled.

Pesticides in soft drinks

Adopting dual standards is a practice large multi national corporations follow especially when it comes to developing countries. Soft drinks industry is a classic case of this as the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) discovered way back in 2003.  A laboratory report prepared by CSE detailed some astonishing facts about the extent of pesticide contamination in soft drinks sold in India.

Pesticides in bottled water

One often finds unsuspecting people buying bottled water or packaged drinking water thinking its safe. Well think again. As the Centre for Science and Environment laboratory report found after analysing bottled water samples from Mumbai and Delhi these products can be far more lethal than one can imagine. The samples contained a deadly cocktail of pesticide residues. What is worse most of the samples contained as many as five different pesticide residues, in levels far exceeding the standards specified as safe for drinking water.

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