India | Centre for Science and Environment

India


CSE Lab Report: Phthalates in Toys

Delhi NGO Centre for Science and Environment tested 24 toy samples of major brands for the presence of phthalates. In October 2008, it randomly purchased toy samples from markets in Delhi. Fifteen were soft toys and nine hard toys made in four countries.

Toxic toys

We generally take toys for granted but this may no longer be the case atleast not if we are concerned about the health of our young children.

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BIS agrees Phthalates are harmful

The BIS agrees that there is a need to regulate the use of phthalates in toys. The BIS stated this in a response to the Bombay High Court on Feb 24th 2011.

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Special Mention on Cancer Train

By H K Dua in the Rajya Sabha on March 9, 2011
 
Train No 339 leaves Abohar every night to reach Bikaner next morning.  Over a period of time it has come to be known as “Cancer Train”.  This train has acquired the dubious reputation simply because nearly 100 cancer patients travel by it from Punjab to Bikaner for diagnosis and treatment at the Acharya Tulsi Regional Cancer Treatment and Research Institute.

Pesticide residues in blood of Punjab farmers

Pesticides are commonly used in India but this comes at great cost to human health. The Centre for Science and Environment decided to investigate the matter and looked at the agricultural heartland of Punjab. It found that  15 different pesticides in the 20 blood samples tested from four villages in Punjab. But what is more important to find out is how much of pesticide in blood is ‘safe’. Does a safety threshold level exist? If yes, how do scientists — and the industry — compute it?

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Pact on POPs

India signs Stockholm Convention

Source Url: 
http://downtoearth.org.in/node/14737

Endosulfan Conspiracy

It was in February 2001 that Down To Earth broke the story.

Source Url: 
http://www.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/node/457

Indian scientists: missing in action

By: Sunita Narain

I suspect Indian scientists have retired hurt to the pavilion. They were exposed to nasty public scrutiny on a deal made by a premier science research establishment, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), with Devas, a private company, on the allocation of spectrum. The public’s verdict was that the arrangement was a scandal; public resources had been given away for a song.

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