Water Management | Centre for Science and Environment

Water Management


Patna drinks its own sewage, says urban water-wastewater study done by CSE

Patna, May 25, 2012: Patna suffers from a problem of plenty – of water and sewage. It depends on the Ganga and groundwater for drinking.

Patna drinks its own sewage

CSE's 7th State of India Environment Report, Excreta Matters, was released, debated and discussed in Patna at seminar held at A N College on May 25, 2012. The meet was attended by 90 people, including Prem Kumar, Minister of Urban Development, Government of Bihar, along with senior officials of the Bihar Urban Development Corporation, Bihar Jal Parishad, PHED and State Pollution Control Board. Civil society representatives and concerned citizens too were present.

Agra is growing, but for how long?

Excreta Matters

CSE's 7th State of India Environment Report, Excreta Matters, was released, debated and discussed in Agra at seminar held at the Karyakaari sabha kaksh (Agra Nagar Nigam) on May 5, 2012. The meet was attended by 50 people, including the Agra District Collector Ajay Chauhan, Member of Parliament from Agra Ram Shankar, the general managers of the Uttar Pradesh Jal Sansthan and UP Jal Nigam, the regional officer of UP Pollution Control Board, as well as civil society representatives and concerned citizens.

Contact Address

 
  Dr. Suresh Kumar Rohilla
  Programme Director
  Email: srohilla@cseindia.org
 
  Sushmita Sengupta
  Deputy Programme Manager
  Email: sushmita@cseindia.org
  Mob: +91-9899928837
 

Gurgaon is growing, but for how long?

CSE report on water-sewage management of Gurgaon says the city may soon be hit by the twin trauma of no water and overflowing sewage

Front Page Teaser: 

CSE report on water-sewage management of Gurgaon says the city may soon be hit by the twin trauma of no water and overflowing sewage

Grand distraction called river interlinking

Last fortnight, the Supreme Court issued a diktat to the government to implement the scheme to interlink rivers. The directions are straightforward.

Towards Lake Conservation

7 August, 2011

Dhaka, Bangladesh

Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) India and Bangladesh Institute of Planners, Bangladesh (BIP) Bangladesh jointly organised a day  long workshop on lake conservation of Dhaka on August 7, 2011, The workshop was attended by researchers, activists, planners, advocates and regulators from both Bangladesh and India. The meeting was a first initiative to influence the policy debate on lakes in South Asia.

dhaka_bangladesh.jpg

Water v industry: where is the question?

Some hundred people, men and women, were gathered on the hill. Many more, I could see, were trudging up. Their faces were resolute. I asked why they were opposing the cement plant. Their answer was simple: “We cannot eat cement.” “But the plant will bring you employment and prosperity,” I said. The reply this time, with a touch of irritation, was: “We have our fields and now with the water in the tank we have good produce. We are not rich like you but we have food to eat.” I persisted, “But your land is not being taken away to build the plant. The government says it has only allocated village grazing land and wasteland to build the factory.” Their anger spilled out.

Rivers at risk

By: Bharat Lal Seth

Securing water for people does not have to be at the cost of biodiversity

How climate ready are we?

By: Sunita Narain

The world can shape the debate on climate link in two ways. One, it can argue endlessly about the scientific veracity of the link between human-induced climate change and the floods in Pakistan. Two, the world can agree that even if a single event—like the Pakistan floods that drowned a fifth of the country— cannot be ascribed to climate change, there is no doubt that a link exists between such events and climate change. The Pakistan meteorological department’s data shows the country received 200 to 700 per cent more rainfall than average. Rains came in cloudbursts in ecologically fragile mountainous areas and led to natural dam bursts and floods downstream. Rains were incessant leading to more floods and greater devastation.

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