CSE Study | Centre for Science and Environment

CSE Study


Antiboitics in Honey

Ayurveda prescribes it for a range of ailments. People eat it for rejuvenation and boosting immunity. An Indian homemaker’s kitchen shelf is incomplete without a jar of this amber liquid. But without quality and safety controls, this gift of nature has been contaminated. CSE laboratory tests find high levels of antibiotics in well-known brands of honey sold in the market.

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India holds on to Endosulfan

At the sixth meeting of Persistent Organic Pollutants Review Committee (POPRC) to the Stockholm Convention (Geneva Oct 11-15), India once again opposed a global ban on the manufacture, use, import and export of endosulfan. Of the 29 members in the review committee, 24 supported the ban and four (Germany, Ghana, Nigeria and China) abstained.

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At the sixth meeting of Persistent Organic Pollutants Review Committee (POPRC) to the Stockholm Convention (Geneva Oct 11-15), India once again opposed a global ban on the manufacture, use, import and export of endosulfan. Of the 29 members in the review committee, 24 supported the ban and four (Germany, Ghana, Nigeria and China) abstained.

CSE lab study: Busting the myth about ‘pure and natural’ honey

New Delhi, September 15, 2010

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A latest study by CSE’s Pollution Monitoring Lab finds antibiotic contamination in honey; investigations by Down To Earth points to double standards in regulations as foreign brands sold in India also have contamination

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Press Note: After CSE, CPCB also finds UCIL site highly contaminated

On October 29, 2009, scientists from the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) and Centre for Science and Environment (CSE)-Pollution Monitoring Laboratory had jointly collected soil samples from inside the former Union Carbide plant at Bhopal.

Press Note: How emissions-intensive are our industries?

 
How emissions-intensive are our industries?

A note on CSE’s latest report, Challenge of the New Balance

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June 1, 2010
Joint meeting organized by IIT-Bombay and CSE.

CSE Press Note: Clean air before the Games: Are we living up to it?

  • CSE releases the results of its latest assessment of pre-Commonwealth air quality and air pollution control measures 
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May 10, 2010 
Delhi needs a combination of long lasting reforms as well as a contingent plan to clean up its air before the 2010 Commonwealth Games, says CSE analysis.

Challenge of the New Balance

This book is based on a study of the six most energy/emissions-intensive sectors of India, with the aim of determining India's low carbon growth options. The sectors covered are power, steel, aluminium, cement, fertilisers and paper and pulp. Together, these six sectors account for an estimated 61.5 per cent of the total greenhouse gas emissions in India (excluding emissions from agriculture and waste)…
 
Price Rs 690 (USD 39)
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2010: choose your future today

A new decade. For me, three decades of work in environment. I wonder: have matters improved since the early 1980s, when I began? Or, are things worse off? Where do we go from here?

Toys

Press Release
January 15, 2010
The trouble with toys…
Latest CSE study finds high levels of toxic phthalates in children’s toys in India

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Lab Report
:: Phthalates in Toys
:: Details of the samples of toys tested
   by CSE

Fact Sheet
:: Regulations
:: Health Implications

Presantation
:: Toxic Toys

DTE Cover story

Hand to mouth
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CSE Lab Report: Phthalates in Toys

Delhi NGO Centre for Science and Environment tested 24 toy samples of major brands for the presence of phthalates. In October 2008, it randomly purchased toy samples from markets in Delhi. Fifteen were soft toys and nine hard toys made in four countries. Tests showed all samples contained one or more phthalates— DEHP, DINP, DBP ( di-n-butyl phthalate) and BBP (benzyl butyl phthalate), all harmful—in varying concentrations.
 
 

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