Public Transport and Mobility | Centre for Science and Environment

Public Transport and Mobility


Transit conundrum

We never expected public transport to catch the political imagination in the car maniacal city of Delhi. So we were pleasantly surprised by the recent budget of the Delhi government. The transport sector has hogged the biggest pie of the total budgetary allocation – nearly one-fourth of the total plan outlay.

SMALL CARS - BIG DILEMMAS

The farmers of Singur in West Bengal are desperate to save their land from transforming into an assembly line for cars of Tata Motors priced at one lakh rupees (US$2222). While the state’s left front government is eager to oblige with cheap land deal, the Union government is ready with more tax cuts to shorten the fuse and set off explosion in car sales.

Why CSE says ‘NO’ to cars

Press Note: March 13, 2009 
Cars may drive growth and aspirations, but they can never meet the commuting needs of urban India. Cars choke cities, harm public health and guzzle more oil.
More than a half of our cities, especially the smaller ones, are getting smothered by critical levels of pollution and congestion.

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Mobility Crisis

The biggest challenge that confronts cities today is the intractable problem of automobile dependence. As the automobile dependence continues to grow, it is adversely affecting the quality of urban life. Congestion, unsafe roads and pollution remain their bane. Unless accompanied by policies to restrict the growth in car and motorised two-wheeler travel, cities will run hard only to stand still.

We need a Union Budget that works for bus users, not private car owners: CSE

 
New Delhi, June 22, 2009: “Tax our cars, Mr Finance Minister, not our buses”: this is – once again -- the message that Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) has for Pranab Mukherjee, as he gets set to present the new government’s first Budget.

EPCA decides on action plan for eight critically polluted cities in India:

EPCA decides on action plan for eight critically polluted cities in India
February 5, 2009

International transport expert reviews Delhi BRT:

International transport expert reviews Delhi BRT:
February 7, 2009

The right right

The world’s cheapest car, the Nano, rolls out in India this week. Manufacturer Tata Motors says it will change the way Indians drive, for the inauguration places the personal car within the reach of people who once could only dream of owning one. Indeed, the Nano has been marketed as an ‘aspiration’—the right of every Indian to a car. No quibble here. There is no question an affordable car is better than an expensive one; or that a small car, being more fuel efficient, is better than a big one.

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