Food safety and toxins | Centre for Science and Environment

Food safety and toxins


CSE dispels recent myths perpetuated by Indian poultry industry on use of antibiotics in chicken

  • Reveals that poultry industry is misleading the public by saying that residues found in Indian chicken are lower than the EU standards. 

Latest study by CSE’s Pollution Monitoring Lab finds antibiotic residues in chicken

Growing antibiotic-resistance in humans also because of large-scale indiscriminate use of antibiotics in poultry industry, claims CSE study

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Junk Food Targeted at children

There is nothing called junk food” – says the food industry. This was the contention that the industry had put forth to a committee set up in 2013 under directions from the Delhi High Court. The committee had been tasked to frame guidelines for junk food in the country. I was a member of the committee, along with extremely dedicated, committed and knowledgeable medical professionals.

Read more...

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Global civil society issues 'Declaration on Antibiotic Resistance', urges action to avert post-antibiotic era

The Antibiotic Resistance Coalition releases declaration aimed to contain the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. Centre for Science and Environment, as part of the coalition, urges leadership and action by the ongoing World Health Assembly

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Unregulated and unlawful

Presence of heavy metals in cosmetics – a CSE study release

Health Impact of Heavy Metals in Cosmetics

A variety of chemicals are used in cosmetics as ingredients and some are used as preservatives. These chemicals have different health effects.

Data Charts

Chromium in lipsticks

CSE calculated the exposure to heavy metals from cosmetics as percentage of Average Daily Intake (ADI). ADI is the maximum amount of a toxin that a person can be exposed to without any appreciable health risk. The graph below shows the level of exposure from Chromium in different brands of lipsticks as per cent of ADI. Exposure from two types of use—average use (24mg/day) and high use (87mg/day)—has been calculated.

CSE seeks clarification

CSE shared its findings with the respective companies to find out the reasons for the presence of such high levels of heavy metals in cosmetics. “We hoped that this would help find ways to limit the presence of heavy metals in cosmetics,” say CSE researchers. After several months of correspondence about batch details, testing methodology and follow-ups, only seven companies responded—The Body Shop India, Lakme of Hindustan Unilever Ltd, Hindustan Unilever Ltd, Emami Ltd, ELCA Cosmetics Pvt Ltd (Estee lauder), Modi Revlon Pvt Ltd and ITC Ltd.

Regulations for cosmetics

India

Cosmetics products in India are regulated under the Drugs and cosmetics Act 1940 and Rules 1945 and Labeling Declarations by Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS). BIS sets the standards for cosmetics for the products listed under Schedule ‘S’ of the Drugs and cosmetics Rules 1945 .

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