Centre for Science and Environment


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Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) India and Work for Better Bangladesh trust (WBB) Bangladesh jointly organised a day long workshop on lake conservation in Dhaka on September 26, 2012. The workshop was attended by regulators, researchers, environmental lawyers and prominent NGOs from India and Bangladesh. The meeting was a second of its kind to influence the policy debate on lakes in South Asia. The first such meeting was organised in August 2011 by CSE and Bangladesh
Institute of Planners (BIP) in Dhaka.

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Urban waterbodies play an important role in flood control, groundwater recharge and water supply to help cities adapt to climate change effects.

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7 August, 2011

Dhaka, Bangladesh

Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) India and Bangladesh Institute of Planners, Bangladesh (BIP) Bangladesh jointly organised a day  long workshop on lake conservation of Dhaka on August 7, 2011, The workshop was attended by researchers, activists, planners, advocates and regulators from both Bangladesh and India. The meeting was a first initiative to influence the policy debate on lakes in South Asia.

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Every Indian city, worth its salt, was known by its water body. In fact, localities were named after this wealth. It made the city, because, people understood the connection between these structures built to harvest rain and their drinking water.

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Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) has come up with a book on ponds of  Kolkata called "Old Mirrors-Traditional ponds of Kolkata" in the begining of this year. The author of the book is Mohit Ray. Ray is the founder director of a Kolkata based non profit organization, Vasundhara. He has documented 48 ponds of Kolkata. The age of some ponds is 250 years and 24 of them are 200-300 years old.  He had studies all the 48 ponds in details. He gave an elaborate history of the ponds and along with that he researched out the present conditions of these water bodies.

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Traditionally, water was seen as a responsibility of citizens and the community collectively took the responsibility of not only building but also of maintaining the water bodies. Since independence, the government has taken control over the water bodies and water supply.

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