Centre for Science and Environment


Friday, August 5, 2005 - 12:49

New Delhi, August 5, 2005: India is protecting its tigers against all odds; the biggest threat to the tiger today is not poaching per se, but a deadly combination of the poachers’ guns and the growing anger of people who live in and around tiger habitats, says Joining the Dots, the report of the Tiger Task Force submitted to prime minister Manmohan Singh today.

Tuesday, June 7, 2005 - 12:31

Chandigarh, June 7, 2005: A study by the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), a New Delhi-based research and advocacy organisation, has found very high levels of pesticide residues in human blood samples taken from Punjab villages. The study conducted by the Centre’s Pollution Monitoring Laboratory appears in the fortnightly newsmagazine Down To Earth (June 15, 2005).

Thursday, May 19, 2005 - 12:51

Tiger Task Force holds first set of consultations with experts. Finds Indian tiger faces huge challenges: extensive, highly organised international poaching networks, lack of professional law enforcement to break through international crime, abysmally low conviction rate for poaching offenders and most importantly, increasing hostility of local communities who share the tiger's habitat because of years of mismanagement and conservation policies that exclude people from protected areas. It is clear that the tiger crisis needs serious and considered response. No quick fix solution will work agree experts and members.

Thursday, September 30, 2004 - 16:37

September 30, 2004 
Pulp and paper industry rated for the second time by CSE.
The rating pushes companies to improve their environmental performance

  • The second rating of the pulp and paper sector shows visible improvements in environmental performance of large companies.
  • CSE’s data shows that industry can work to provide jobs and a growth model -- it can provide employment to 0.55 million farming families just from tree plantation, and can make India a pulp-surplus country.
  • The credibility of the rating works as a reputational incentive to drive change in the sector.
Monday, November 3, 2003 - 17:09

Mercury, a very toxic and dangerous substance, has severely contaminated land, water, air and the food chain throughout India.

Sunday, August 17, 2003 - 12:49

New Delhi, August 17, 2003: From attacking CSE’s testing methodology; trying to pass off water tests instead of tests on the final product; using the WTO as a bogeyman; questioning the existence of laboratories in the country that can test their products; to even questioning the existence of standards elsewhere in the world. Pepsi and Coca-Cola are trying every trick in the corporate book to discredit concerns raised by the CSE report on pesticides in aerated drinks sold in India.

Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - 12:49

The Supreme Court today asked Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages to withdraw its petition, saying there were no grounds for the Court to hear the issue.

Although a copy of the petition was not yet available, Mr Kapil Sibal, counsel for Coca-Cola, argued that the tests on cola samples were being carried out by laboratories across the country that are not accredited and without any standards for pesticide levels in the country.

Monday, August 11, 2003 - 12:49

The Centre for Science and Environment welcomes the decision of the High Court in response to a petition filed by PepsiCo India Holdings Pvt Ltd and Others, calling for an expert committee to review the findings of pesticide residues in carbonated soft drinks. The experts’ findings are to be made available in 3 weeks.

All sides agreed that the government should choose the laboratories where the testing is done, and samples for testing should be picked up at random from the market, not provided by the company.

Friday, August 8, 2003 - 00:00

New Delhi, August 8, 2003: The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) welcomes the Union government’s initiative to have soft drinks sold by the two cola giants independently tested for pesticide residues. CSE advises the government to broaden the ambit: testing must be done also for residues of cadmium, arsenic and lead, since the standard for these hazardous substances is much higher – 50 times – than what is legislated for the bottled water industry.

Thursday, August 7, 2003 - 12:49

New Delhi August 7, 2003: The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) would like to express its disbelief and its annoyance at the way the soft drink industry is trying to make a mockery of the Indian public and the media. Since CSE's report was released on August 5, soft drink manufacturers have not hesitated to call CSE by every possible name and to attack its credibility; they have also termed its reports "baseless". CSE did not respond because it wanted to see the data that the soft drink manufacturers had in their defense.

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