Mining | Centre for Science and Environment

Mining


Coal politics in an unequal world

Australia is a coal country. It is big business—miners are important in politics and black gold exports dominate the country’s finances. But dirty and polluting coal evokes emotions in environmentally concerned people. Coal-based power provides 40 per cent of the world’s electricity and emits one-third of global carbon dioxide, which is pushing the world to climate change. 

Western Ghats: lessons in protection

Madhav Gadgil and K Kasturirangan are both scientists of great repute. But both are caught up in a controversy on how the Western Ghats—the vast biological treasure trove spread over the states of Gujarat, Maharashtra, Goa, Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu—should be protected. First the Ministry of Environment and Forests asked Gadgil to submit a plan for protection of the Ghats. When this was done in mid-2011, the ministry sat on the document for months, refusing to release it even for public discussion.

CSE criticises the United Progressive Alliance government's move to let the Mines and Minerals (Development and Regulation) Bill lapse

  • The Mines and Minerals (Development and Regulation) (MMDR) Bill 2011 was tabled in Parliament in December, 2011 – it will lapse if not passed 

CSE’s short-term EIA training programme on MINING PROJECTS

The minerals sector is a key driver for the country’s industrial growth. However, it has brought in its wake severe environmental repercussions and social conflicts. One of the greatest challenges, therefore, is how to make mining environmentally and socially acceptable. Unfortunately, most EIA/SIA reports either overlook or poorly interpret the critical issues related to a mining project.

Front Page Teaser: 

Date: March 24-April 4, 2014

Call the monitor

In Goa mines are closed. In Bellary, iron ore mines, once closed, have been opened on the condition that they will now follow a plan for environmental restoration and will not indulge in unseemly and distasteful activities. But the institutions for checking the reformed miners are still in disarray. They cannot monitor and enforce the rules. So, believe it or not, little will actually change in the Bellary landscape.

Green rupee in a mess

The rupee has crashed, growth is down and there is panic that the India story may be over or, at least, seriously dented. For most commentators, the underlying reason for the decline is green regulations. They think environmentalists are squarely to blame.

Lift your head from the sand

The outrage over the suspension of an official, Durga Shakti Nagpal, for simply doing her job—check illegal sand mining in the rivers of Uttar Pradesh—has highlighted a crucial issue. It is now evident that illegal mining of sand from rivers and beaches is rampant and the underbelly of this industry (I’m calling it industry for want of a better word) is powerful and connected. Worse still, all this is happening in violation of the orders of the apex court of the country.

Supreme Court lifts ban on 63 more mines in Bellary

 Sets condition of compensatory payment to resume operations
The Supreme Court allowed operations in 63 out of 72 category B mines in Bellary, Chitradurga and Tumkur in Karnataka, subject to conditions.

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