Fossil Fuels | Centre for Science and Environment

Fossil Fuels


How power can be cleaned

Coal is an environmentalist’s bugbear. The use of coal to generate energy is the key reason the world is looking at a catastrophic future because of climate change. Recognising this, global civil society has given a rousing call for coal divestment, asking companies, universities and individuals to stop investment in coal thermal power plants. They want coal to go, renewables to be in. And in the interim, clean gas, also a fossil fuel, to be used as a “bridge fuel”. In this scenario any talk of “cleaning” coal to make it less damaging is untenable.

Walk the talk on carbon tax, Mr Finance Minister

Budget 2015, presented by Finance Minister Arun Jaitley, has a first. In it, India has accepted that it has a de-facto carbon tax—on petroleum products and dirty coal. Arguably, the only big green initiative of this budget is the increase of cess on coal—from Rs 100 per tonne to Rs 200 per tonne. But the question is: is this carbon tax, imposed on the carbon content of fuel, doing what it should—reduce greenhouse gas emissions that are responsible for climate change?

Coal politics in an unequal world

Australia is a coal country. It is big business—miners are important in politics and black gold exports dominate the country’s finances. But dirty and polluting coal evokes emotions in environmentally concerned people. Coal-based power provides 40 per cent of the world’s electricity and emits one-third of global carbon dioxide, which is pushing the world to climate change. 

How to rewrite the Durban script

It’s that time of the year again. Climate change talks are heating up, with the next conference of parties scheduled in Durban in end-November. There is heat but no light. The negotiations are stuck despite the clear signs of climate change: dangerous and potentially catastrophic extreme weather events.

Press Release: Euro IV norms in 13 cities, but rest of India left in the lurch

 

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March 31, 2010

As Bharat Stage IV norms for fuels and vehicles come into force from April 1, 2010 in 13 cities of India, the automobile industry is trying its best to delay the implementation of Bharat Stage III norms for vehicles in the rest of India.

Publication: Slow Murder

Documents the deadly story of air pollution caused by vehicles. Vehicular pollution is no longer just an intangible threat in India - it contributes to a shocking 64 per cent of the total pollution in Delhi, 52 per cent in Mumbai and 30 per cent in Kolkata.

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