Climate Change | Centre for Science and Environment

Climate Change


Equitywatch

CSE takes on climate change
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Move over boys and girls, the men are here: the future of climate negotiations and why India wants the Accord

Somebody recently asked me why India supported the Copenhagen Accord. It is correct to say that the proposed accord has no meaningful targets for emission reduction from Annex 1 (industrialized countries). Global emissions will increase or reduce at best marginally.

Climate Change: Politics and Facts

 

This is a new book from Centre for Science and Environment that attempts to demystify the subject through a set of comprehensive and concise factsheets. A one-stop storehouse of information on climate change, as it is an aid towards understanding and appreciating the danger that stares us in the face.

Price: Rs 340.00 (USD 14)
Pages: 107

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Mean Sea Level

 

Around 7500 Kms from the heart of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [IPCC] in Geneva or the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change [UNFCCC] secretariat in Bonn, Ghoramara and Sagar islands are going through their own testimony of climate change related phenomena.

Format: DVD
Duration: 58:25 Minutes
Price: Rs 950.00 (USD 30)

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India should not support the Copenhagen Accord, says CSE

New Delhi, January 8, 2010: India should not sign and endorse the Copenhagen Agreement, says CSE. The Accord is an extremely weak document, which deliberately forgives industrialised countries’ historical responsibility for climate change and worse, is designed for meaningless and ineffective action to curb global warming.

2nd coalition of the willing: bad for climate and for us

Let me be straight: As the clock ticks to Copenhagen, how low is the world prepared to prostrate to get climate-renegade US on board? Is a bad deal in Copenhagen better than no deal?

Who’s afraid of 2°C?

The latest fuss about the 2°C global temperature target India apparently acceded to at the Major Economies Forum in L’Aquila, Italy, is important to unravel. The declaration by the world’s 20 biggest and most powerful countries recognized the scientific view that the increase in global average temperature above pre-industrial levels should not exceed 2°C. The statement was widely criticized in India as a sign we had ‘given in’ to pressure to take commitments, to cap our emissions.

Another co2alition of the willing?

It was the biannual gathering of over 100,000 Protestants in Bremen, a small town in Germany. As the articulate minister for environment, Sigmar Gabriel, came to participate in a discussion on energy security for a climate-secure world, many stood up. Soon the hall was full of blue placards, held high, all saying: “No to coal.” The minister, I could see, was riled. He believed he was the environmentalist in the crowd. He said he would build coal power stations, because the country was phasing out nuclear power.

Satellites record unprecedented warming over the Himalayas

Satellites record unprecedented warming over the Himalayas: potential implications on Indian monsoon and glaciers'

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