Environment Impact Assessment (EIA) | Centre for Science and Environment

Environment Impact Assessment (EIA)


Green clearance test for NDA

Environmentalists are rightly alarmed that the NDA government is busy dismantling the environmental regulatory system in the country. Over the past two months, the media has reported that clearances for projects, from mining to roads, have been fast-tracked. While the web¬site of the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MOEF) has not been updated in August, in the two months till July end, forest clearance was granted to over 92 pro¬jects, which will divert some 1,600 hectares of forest.

Lift your head from the sand

The outrage over the suspension of an official, Durga Shakti Nagpal, for simply doing her job—check illegal sand mining in the rivers of Uttar Pradesh—has highlighted a crucial issue. It is now evident that illegal mining of sand from rivers and beaches is rampant and the underbelly of this industry (I’m calling it industry for want of a better word) is powerful and connected. Worse still, all this is happening in violation of the orders of the apex court of the country.

EIA review of a coal mine and washery in Raigarh - Upcoming public hearing!

Centre for Science and Environment carried out the technical analysis of the EIA-EMP report of Gare Pelma Block III coal mining and washery. This was on a request from Raghubeer Pradhan of Ekta Parishad. The project is to come up in the Mand-Raigarh coalfields in Raigarh district of Chhattisgarh.
 
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EIA analysis of an expansion project in Raigarh - Korba West Power Co. Ltd.

Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) carried out a technical analysis of the EIA report of the expansion project of thermal power plant of M/s Korba West Power Company Limited. The analysis was carried out on the request of Raghuvir Pradhan of Ekta Parishad. The public hearing for the project was scheduled on February 9, 2012.

EIA analysis of MSP Sponge Iron

Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) analysed the EIA report of the proposed expansion of a ferro alloy plant and captive thermal power plant. The plant belongs to MSP sponge Iron Limited with capacity of 63,000 tonnes per annum (TPA) of silico manganese  and 92,475 TPA of Ferro manganese proposed to come up in village Manuwapali of Riagarh district in Chhattisgarh. Raghubeer Pradhan of Ekta Parishad approached CSE to carry out a technical review of this EIA for the public hearing of the project on December 16, 2011.

EIA analysis of a 4,000 MW thermal power plant (Gujarat)

Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) analysed the EIA report of an upcoming thermal power plant of 4,000 megawatt (MW) in Jamnagar district of Gujarat.Mahesh Parmar of Paryavaran Mitra approached CSE to carry out a technical review of this EIA for the public hearing of the project on September 20, 2011.

EIA analysis of a coal washery project

Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) analysed the EIA report of an upcoming coal washery project in Raigarh district of Chhattisgarh. Raghubeer Pradhan of Ekta Parishad approached CSE to carry out a technical review of this EIA for the public hearing of the project on August 29, 2011.

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EIA analysis of Gujarat Pipavav Port expansion

Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) carried out an analysis of the EIA of expansion of Gujarat Pipavav Port located in the Gulf of Cambay. The analysis was requested by a Gujarat based NGO called Paryavaran Mitra.

How to approach environmentalism

By: Sunita Narain

2010 was a loud year for the environment. High profile projects—from Vedanta to Posco and Navi Mumbai airport to Lavasa—hit the headlines for non-compliance with environmental regulations.

While 2009 was the 25th anniversary of the Bhopal gas tragedy, it was only last year that we were all outraged by the disaster. The realisation of how every institution—the judiciary, parliament and government— had miserably failed to provide justice to the victims shocked us deeply.

Water v industry: where is the question?

Some hundred people, men and women, were gathered on the hill. Many more, I could see, were trudging up. Their faces were resolute. I asked why they were opposing the cement plant. Their answer was simple: “We cannot eat cement.” “But the plant will bring you employment and prosperity,” I said. The reply this time, with a touch of irritation, was: “We have our fields and now with the water in the tank we have good produce. We are not rich like you but we have food to eat.” I persisted, “But your land is not being taken away to build the plant. The government says it has only allocated village grazing land and wasteland to build the factory.” Their anger spilled out.

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