Cycles | Centre for Science and Environment

Cycles


Why we cannot ignore the poor

 One thing is clear—the solutions must work for the poor, for them to work for the rich

Some fortnights ago, I had discussed the issue of poverty and environment. I had then said that the question today is not whether the poor are responsible for environmental degradation but whether environmental management works if it does not address inequality and poverty. Why?

Come out and claim the road

I write this column from my bed, recovering from an accident that broke my bones. I was hit by a speeding car when cycling. The car fled the scene, leaving me bleeding on the road. This is what happens again and again, in every city of our country, on every road as we plan without care for the safety of pedestrians and cyclists. These are the invisible users. They die doing nothing more than the most ordinary thing like crossing a road. I was more fortunate. Two cars stopped, strangers helped me and took me to hospital. I got treatment. I will be back fighting fit.

CSE director general Sunita Narain discharged from hospital today

Hit-and-run vehicle not yet identified

Front Page Teaser: 

Hit-and-run vehicle not yet identified

One third of Delhi walks to work, but are our roads designed for safe walking and cycling? Latest CSE survey findings say no

  • Delhi has yet to wake up the mobility crisis. Increased use of cars is reducing people carrying capacity of roads.

  • Total walk and cycle trips are more than double the share of car trips.

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