Lead in paints | Centre for Science and Environment

Lead in paints


India’s Paint Plans

The Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) has prepared a draft notification on lead standards for all the categories of paints used for the household and decorative purposes. For most of the paints the maximum lead limit has been proposed at 90ppm, which is the current global best practice. A few of the industrial paints are to have 300ppm lead limit for technical reasons. The final notifications are yet to come.

Sri Lanka limits lead in paints

Sri Lanka has becomes the latest country to introduce lead in paints standards. The Consumer Affairs Authority published a Gazette order on September 30, 2011 regulating permissible maximum lead content on paints and accessories. It shall come into force from January 1, 2013.

Lead in paints

Modern houses are full of harmful chemicals. One of them is lead, present in paints. Though several countries have banned the use of this substance India is yet to do so, which is why paint makers use them. Inhaling lead dust while performing mundane chores like opening or closing windows is the most common source of lead poisoning. The human body is not designed to process lead. Young children are particularly vulnerable to lead as it can damage the central nervous system and the brain.

Lead in paints

Modern houses are full of harmful chemicals. One of them is lead, present in paints. Though several countries have banned the use of this substance India is yet to do so, which is why paint makers use them. Inhaling lead dust while performing mundane chores like opening or closing windows is the most common source of lead poisoning. The human body is not designed to process lead. Young children are particularly vulnerable to lead as it can damage the central nervous system and the brain.

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