Delhi | Centre for Science and Environment

Delhi


How to Clean the Yamuna

While the Delhi government has been debating on what needs to be done to clean the river, the pollution levels have only worsened.

In its book Sewage Canal: How to Clean the Yamuna, published in 2007, the Centre for Science and Environment reported that the Delhi stretch of the river is not only dead but had an overload of coliform contamination. Two years later, the pollution data shows no respite to the river.

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While the Delhi government has been debating on what needs to be done to clean the river, the pollution levels have only worsened. 
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Before cars take over

There I was, zipping down bustling Ahmedabad. The bus stopped at a station, designed so the doors of the bus and the station open simultaneously to let passengers out and in. People were walking to the station, buying tickets and waiting. A notice flashed when the next bus would arrive. Each bus has a GPS device that transmits its movements to a spiffy control room inside the city corporation. You know when the next bus will come. It will be on time.

Managing Information in the Digital Age

A Short Course on Information Management and Web-based Outreach

Course Date: November 26-29, 2013

 

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Date: November 26-29, 2013

What is the status of air pollution in Delhi?

Delhi has lost the gains of its CNG programme. Its air is increasingly becoming more polluted and unbreathable, bringing back the pre-CNG days when diesel-driven buses and autos had made it one of the most polluted cities on earth.

About Delhi’s water

The quality of ground water is alkaline with pH ranging from 7.1 to 9.2, chloride content ranges between 21 and 1380 ppm. South of Delhi average chloride content is 250 ppm while in Najafgarh area it is around 1000 ppm rendering the water saline covering the area of 32 km. Sq. and marginally saline over the area of 129 sq km.

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Footfalls: Obstacle Course to Livable Cities

This study provides detailed analysis of walking conditions in Indian cities. The analysis indicates that walkability is overlooked and undervalued in transport planning, and that improved walkability is justified for equity and efficiency sake.

It provides specific recommendations for improving walking conditions to address a variety of planning objectives.

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This study provides detailed analysis of walking conditions in Indian cities. The analysis indicates that walkability is overlooked and undervalued in transport planning, and that improved walkability is justified for equity and efficiency sake.

Delhi Bus Corridor: an evaluation

Delhi Bus Corridor:  an evaluation

Dario Hidalgo, PhD, Madhav Pai, MS, EMBARQ,

The WRI Center for Sustainable Transport, Submitted to the Center of Science and the Environment

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