Project Tiger | Centre for Science and Environment

Project Tiger


NTCA Monitoring Committee Press Briefing Note

On September 24, 2008, the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) had set up a three-member Monitoring Committee to oversee the village relocation process and ecotourism strategy in Project Tiger reserves across the country.

The agenda for tiger conservation is urgent. The National Tiger Conservation Authority needs to set clear goals and take tough action, says CSE

New Delhi, November 27, 2006: “Setting up a National Tiger Conservation Authority was a key recommendation of the Tiger Task Force, and we welcome this step. The real test begins now: the Authority must have clear goals to be able to make a difference,” said Sunita Narain, director, Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) at a press briefing here today. Narain had headed the Tiger Task Force set up by the prime minister in 2005 to investigate the tiger crisis and to suggest ways to safeguard the magnificent animal.

Tiger Task Force report presents agenda to save the tiger the Indian way

Recently submitted report says in India, forests are not wilderness but also the habitats of people

Tiger Task Force submits report to prime minister Manmohan Singh Presents an action agenda to save the tiger the Indian way, where forests are not wilderness but also the habitats of people

New Delhi, August 5, 2005: India is protecting its tigers against all odds; the biggest threat to the tiger today is not poaching per se, but a deadly combination of the poachers’ guns and the growing anger of people who live in and around tiger habitats, says Joining the Dots, the report of the Tiger Task Force submitted to prime minister Manmohan Singh today.

No quick fix answers for tiger conservation

Tiger Task Force holds first set of consultations with experts. Finds Indian tiger faces huge challenges: extensive, highly organised international poaching networks, lack of professional law enforcement to break through international crime, abysmally low conviction rate for poaching offenders and most importantly, increasing hostility of local communities who share the tiger's habitat because of years of mismanagement and conservation policies that exclude people from protected areas. It is clear that the tiger crisis needs serious and considered response. No quick fix solution will work agree experts and members.

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