National | Centre for Science and Environment


National

New National Water Policy in the Pipeline

A new and approved National Water Policy is expected to be in place by 2013. The revised policy will take on board crucial issues such as water demand management, equitable distribution, water pricing, stringent regulatory mechanism and allocating priority to water for life-support and ecology over industry. The new approach to the water policy is likely to recognise water as finite and variable. This is supported by the mid-term appraisal report of the XIth Plan, in which the Planning Commission recognised the need to "take a holistic view of the hydrological cycle" to solve the water crisis as India's water situation is even more serious than originally assessed. With this in view, the Centre wants water budgeting and water auditing to be made mandatory and State governments may be advised to set up Independent Water Regulatory Authority for addressing water allocation, water use efficiency and physical and financial sustainability of water resources.  However, even though water harvesting is already given great importance in various state policies, actual groundwork remains woefully inadequate to support the increasing use of groundwater for irrigation and drinking purposes. For every new tubewell being constructed for irrigation purposes, groundwater is being depleted several-fold. This calls for an overhaul of the current attitude towards water recharging, both among the government agencies as well as the public, especially the farming communities. 

 

Announcements

  • Date: September 21-23, 2015

  • Date: October 5-9, 2015

    The Ministry of Urban Development has acknowledged the lack of skilled man power in urban local bodies across India and has therefore developed the ‘Capacity Building Scheme for Urban Local Bodies’ (CBULB). The programme aims to enhance knowledge, skills and attitude of city officials for the mainstreaming of reforms and best management practices (BMPs) of sustainable water and wastewater management through training programmes followed with field exposure visit, seminars and workshops. 

  • Date:  November 18-20, 2015

    ‘Septage’ is both solid and liquid waste that accumulates in onsite sanitation systems (OSS) e.g. septic tanks. This has three main components – scum, effluent and sludge. It has an offensive odour, appearance and contains significant levels of grease, grit, hair, debris and pathogenic micro organisms. The construction and management of OSS are left largely to ineffective local practices and there is lack of holistic septage management practices.

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