Food Safety | Centre for Science and Environment

Food Safety


Moratorium on Bt brinjal: Jairam Ramesh

SAVVY SOUMYA MISRA

On February 9, minister of state for environment Jairam Ramesh announced an indefinite moratorium on introducing Bt brinjal—the first genetically modified crop for mass production in India. In doing so, he overruled the Genetic Engineering Approval Committee (GEAC) that had approved commercial cultivation of the food crop on October 14, 2009.

About Food Safety & Toxins

The programme relies on a two pronged strategy of doing laboratory research to generate empirical data on issues of toxins and food safety and secondly, doing policy research and advocacy to bring about changes in the regulatory and enforcement framework.

Trans fat in oils

Oil is essential for our body to function. But that does not mean that we should take for granted the cooking mediums we use in our food. As the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) laboratory report recently discovered our branded edible oils are full of unhealthy trans fats. The results showed trans fats in seven leading vanaspati brands were five to 12 times the 2 per cent standard set by Denmark. Trans fats are formed during the process of addition of hydrogen atoms to oils, a process industry prefers as it keeps the oil from turning rancid and ensures a longer shelf life.

trans fats.jpg

Cola majors resort to misinformation to counter the CSE report

New Delhi, August 17, 2003: From attacking CSE’s testing methodology; trying to pass off water tests instead of tests on the final product; using the WTO as a bogeyman; questioning the existence of laboratories in the country that can test their products; to even questioning the existence of standards elsewhere in the world. Pepsi and Coca-Cola are trying every trick in the corporate book to discredit concerns raised by the CSE report on pesticides in aerated drinks sold in India.

Supreme Court refuses to entertain COKE Petition

The Supreme Court today asked Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages to withdraw its petition, saying there were no grounds for the Court to hear the issue.

Although a copy of the petition was not yet available, Mr Kapil Sibal, counsel for Coca-Cola, argued that the tests on cola samples were being carried out by laboratories across the country that are not accredited and without any standards for pesticide levels in the country.

CSE Welcomes High Court Decision

The Centre for Science and Environment welcomes the decision of the High Court in response to a petition filed by PepsiCo India Holdings Pvt Ltd and Others, calling for an expert committee to review the findings of pesticide residues in carbonated soft drinks. The experts’ findings are to be made available in 3 weeks.

All sides agreed that the government should choose the laboratories where the testing is done, and samples for testing should be picked up at random from the market, not provided by the company.

CSE welcomes independent testing. ‘Independence’ and ‘credibility’ matter. ‘Accreditation’ is not an issue

New Delhi, August 8, 2003: The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) welcomes the Union government’s initiative to have soft drinks sold by the two cola giants independently tested for pesticide residues. CSE advises the government to broaden the ambit: testing must be done also for residues of cadmium, arsenic and lead, since the standard for these hazardous substances is much higher – 50 times – than what is legislated for the bottled water industry.

PepsiCo and Coca Cola conjure up "data" that seeks to convolute, confuse and take the Indian public for a ride

New Delhi August 7, 2003: The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) would like to express its disbelief and its annoyance at the way the soft drink industry is trying to make a mockery of the Indian public and the media. Since CSE's report was released on August 5, soft drink manufacturers have not hesitated to call CSE by every possible name and to attack its credibility; they have also termed its reports "baseless". CSE did not respond because it wanted to see the data that the soft drink manufacturers had in their defense.

Hard Truths about Soft Drinks

Laboratory test finds pesticide residues in all cold drinks tested. Just as it had in bottled water six months ago. How hollow are the quality claims of soft drink multinationals? How can Indian consumers be saddled with sub-standard products? How can companies get away with such bad practices?

Follow us on 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
gobar times